Friday, March 19, 2010

Games and Instruction by Jenny Levine

I attended the session on Games and Instruction by Jenny Levine. Her presentation is fully online (complete with links) at http://theshiftedlibrarian.com/presentations/2010/20100305AkLA-Gaming4Instruction.pdf

I had thought it would be about incorporating game ideas into library workshop sessions. NOPE. It was about games and how they teach and what games to bring into the library, and how students think now and... It was still useful and interesting.

I also now have a list of games I might want to buy to play with friends and family.

Program Abstract: Using Gaming for Instructional Purposes
Modern games teach kids important 21st century skills such as managing resources, problem solving, analyzing data, and synthesizing information. Is it possible to harness gaming principles to make instruction more interactive and engaging for today’s students? Hear how some libraries are incorporating gaming to teach a variety of social, literary, and curricular skills.

Games that include reflection and strategy

Cool looking games: Flux, Bananagrams, 10 days in Asia, Qwerty warriors.

Someone has mapped HALO to information literacy standards

Look for "research quest" blog

Board games: Quiddler, ticket to ride, numbers league, carcassone

"Libraries Got Game"

University of North Carolina Greensboro: Infolit game that is open source and customizable for your library

"Quarantined" by ASU West Campus

"Head Hunt" by Ohio State


Here are a few notes I took... Just in case

Carnegie Melon: Arcade games i.e. shelve book and I'll get it

Game Maker Academy and Scratch from MIT

"Librarians guide to gaming"

Trading cards nintendo wii characters of staff and students had to get them all to get a cookie, and they did

Geocaching in the library that freshmen can register to play when the register for classes

Fantasy football research lesson plans

Old Bridge Library services for seniors - nintendo wii's with teen mentors

2 comments:

The Waverly Inn said...

I started taking my teenage daughter geocaching two years ago when her math grades started slipping. While I can't take much credit for her improved math grades since then, I do feel that geocaching has helped her learn how mathematics can be useful in her life. It's also taught her that if you stay "on task", there is a reward for completing a job. On top of that it's a terrific and inexpensive way to get some quality family time with your kids!

J Semenza said...

Geocaching is a fabulous idea. One of these days I need to go try it. :)